The Power of Visual Storytelling

Close your eyes for a moment, and think about Apple. Whatever your opinions on the company, images of shiny, sleek devices and cutting-edge technology on black backgrounds probably compose part of your perception. And of course, that simple, symbolic apple logo that is recognizable the world over also comes to mind.

Or consider recent McDonald’s advertisements. McDonald’s ads tend to feature the bright, vibrant colors of fresh ingredients, or the introduction of new premium sandwiches in front of stark black backgrounds.

The images that pop into a consumer’s head when they think about a certain company form a large part of their opinion of that company, and with the integration of visual storytelling into your advertising strategy, you have the power to control exactly what those images are.

Visual storytelling is something that is very understandable—it predates language itself. It can convey a message with power and emotion. If a picture is worth a thousand words, then a well-placed image can increase the impact of your advertisement many times over. So what makes an image powerful?

The images in your visual storytelling campaign must feel authentic to the consumer. They want to believe that the people they are seeing aren’t posed, that this is just a part of their everyday life. Grabbing any stock picture from the Internet and tossing some words in front of it just won’t cut it.

The images in a visual storytelling campaign must also be current. Not only do consumers want to see an authentic image, but they want to see a connection to the issues and problems of the world today—they want to believe that this person lives in the same world that they do.

Given the power of good design to custom-build a brand image in the eyes of the consumer, it is important to get it right. It is crucial to partner with the right branding team in order to make sure the images you put out are saying what you want them to say. We have the experience and creativity necessary to set your story apart in an advertising space cluttered with stories.